Research

Research at GRIPP -The Bigger Picture:

Since its establishment in 2011, GRIPP continues to initiate and develop multifaceted research programs to further its conservation mandate. With highly trained personnel specializing in the fields of plant tissue culture, protoplast technology, molecular biology, phytochemistry, plant production systems and cryopreservation, the GRIPP research programs target specific aspects of plant science and conservation while working towards the primary objective of plant biodiversity conservation.

Programs developed at GRIPP aim not only to multiply and replant germplasm but its long term storage as well. GRIPP currently maintains an in vitro germplasm collection comprised of over 60 species from all around the globe and is in the process of developing its own Cryo-Bank intended for the long term cryopreservation of germplasm with regeneration capabilities. GRIPP is also studying plant-pathogen relationships and the development of disease resistance in susceptible plant species.

All programs are conducted at the Plant Cell Technology Laboratory (PCTL), under the direction of Professor Praveen K. Saxena.

Cryopreservation, a complementary conservation approach to in vitro cell and tissue culture, has also been successfully employed for plant preservation at GRIPP. Cryopreservation techniques, i.e. storage at ultra-low temperature (usually in...

New protoplast technology developed at GRIPP, utilizes inhibitors of the phenylpropanoid pathway to facilitate protoplast isolation from recalcitrant species such as American elm. Protoplast fusion and transformation procedures for elm...

Combining micropropagation with plant growth in controlled environment systems, GRIPP has been able to develop large scale multiplication procedures for a number of species. Use of bioreactors, growth chambers and greenhouses, allow for the...

Since the onset of Dutch Elm Disease in North America in the early 1900’s, the disease has ravaged 95% of the population of American elm. GRIPP has developed an efficient procedure for the in vitro propagation of the surviving mature elm trees....

Indiscriminate harvest, poor perpetuity in nature, and lack of efficiency with conventional propagation methods, pose major limitations in the conservation and restoration of many plant species. In vitro cell and tissue culture can facilitate a...